Cracking Down on Student Dress Code

Student+is+dress+coded+and+sent+to+ISS+for+wearing+ripped+jeans.+Student+clothing+in+ISS+varies+from+many+holes+to+few.
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Cracking Down on Student Dress Code

Student is dress coded and sent to ISS for wearing ripped jeans. Student clothing in ISS varies from many holes to few.

Student is dress coded and sent to ISS for wearing ripped jeans. Student clothing in ISS varies from many holes to few.

Joe Joseph

Student is dress coded and sent to ISS for wearing ripped jeans. Student clothing in ISS varies from many holes to few.

Joe Joseph

Joe Joseph

Student is dress coded and sent to ISS for wearing ripped jeans. Student clothing in ISS varies from many holes to few.

Jasmine Boyens, Editor

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The school administration cracked down on student dress code enforcement during the first week of the new school year.

According to in-school suspension (ISS) records, more than 300 students spent time in ISS since the first day of school for violating the school district’s dress code policy. This number does not include students who were held in a second room. The additional classroom was needed because of overcrowding.

The district’s dress code policy is no different than it was last year. Orange County Public Schools requires that “clothing with holes, tears, or inappropriate patches will not be allowed if considered obscene.” It’s this part of the dress code policy that has caused students to go to ISS for wearing ripped jeans.

“The district clearly says no holes, so no holes,” said John Simmons, 12th-grade dean.

However, students such as Caitlin McDaniel believe that there is room for interpretation as to what is considered “obscene.”

Simmons also explained that allowing students to have holes or tears below the knee only left room for some students to “push the limits.”

Junior Shellcie Ayala said she was sent to ISS for wearing ripped jeans during the first Tuesday of the school year. Ayala said her skin wasn’t exposed at all.

“They want us to learn, but they put us in a classroom just over some pants,” said Ayala.

She believes that the negative effect on classroom time is not worth the enforcement of the policy on ripped clothing.

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