La La Land: This Years Promising Lollapalooza

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La La Land: This Years Promising Lollapalooza

Source: Indiewire

Source: Indiewire

Source: Indiewire

Source: Indiewire

Samantha Bailon, Editor in Chief

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With a new wave of musicals this past decade from Tim Burton’s Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street to Lin-Manuel’s Hamilton, LA LA Land is one that will surely be engraved into the books of pure unadulterated greatness. Reaching high status thus far, even being compared to the classic 1952 musical-romance Singin’ in the Rain directed by Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen, the film has only prospered since it’s release in December.

A film set in Los Angeles, two individuals, a tiring actress seeking her big break into Hollywood, Mia (Emma Stone) and a traditional pianist fighting to keep jazz alive, Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) continually run into each other and evidently fall in love. Directed by Damien Chazelle, this original score modern day musical has been a work in progress since 2010.

After Chazelle’s major success with Whiplash, released in 2014 he stated in an interview with Variety his next project would be a musical. With a hold on for funding, Lionsgate finally decided to cough up $30 million and financially fund La La Land once seeing Whiplash.

In the film, the audience gets to see a new side of Stone and Gosling who have been perceived as a unique choice. However, Stone has had a background in the live theater featuring as Sally Bowles in the broadway production Cabaret. Although Chazelle’s first initial choice was Michael B. Jordan, Gosling re-introduced himself as a dancer as viral videos from his childhood have reappeared. Gosling also plays and sings in the band Dead Man’s Bones since 2007, making Stone and Gosling perfectly eligible for the roles not including their compelling on-screen romance in which they have mastered in countless movies prior.

Although La La Land had only been released in select theaters, limiting public access to the film, it has globally reached a $64.8 million profit, earned an 8.7/10 on IMDb, and has been nominated for 14 Academy Awards as well as swept the Golden Globes with six awards this past month.

Within the two hours, hand-deep in a large unnecessary amount of popcorn and another hand clutched to an enormous soda, in the film you not only nod along to the music but begin to appreciate the details of cinematography. The lighting, the camera work, and the sound met with the high standards as if in a prestigious theater production. It complemented the emotions Mia and Sebastian would embark and the music you would be reciting long after leaving.

The theme of the movie was not only about love but the hardships that came along when following a dream. As cliche as it may appear, Chazelle demonstrated the acts of rejection and a mix of reality without an overbearing amount of fluff. It spoke to a wide range of dreamers, young to old while incorporating a variety of beautiful melodies such as “City of Stars” and “The Fools Who Dream” intended to keep you on your toes and your heart at ease.  

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